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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 196-200

Sleep patterns, hygiene and daytime sleepiness among adolescent school-goers in three districts of Tamil Nadu: A descriptive study


1 Undergraduate students, Employees State Insurance Corporation Medical College and Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Ashok Pillar Main Road, K.K. Nagar, Chennai 600078, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Employees State Insurance Corporation Medical College and Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Ashok Pillar Main Road, K.K. Nagar, Chennai 600078, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Vijayaprasad Gopichandran
Department of Community Medicine, Employees State Insurance Corporation Medical College and Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Ashok Pillar Main Road, K.K. Nagar, Chennai 600078, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-258X.258216

Background. Sleep is important for the growth, development and good health of adolescents. We assessed sleep patterns, hygiene and daytime sleepiness among school-going adolescents in 3 districts of Tamil Nadu. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 538 school-going adolescents between the ages of 10 and 17 years, from 8 schools in 3 districts of Thiruvallur, Thiruppur and Namakkal selected through multistage sampling. A questionnaire with items focusing on demographic details, sleep patterns, sleep hygiene behaviour and daytime sleepiness was given to the students for self-administration after obtaining informed consent from their parents and school authorities. Results. Over 64% of adolescents sleep <8 hours at night with 5.6% sleeping <6 hours. About 48% of adolescents suffered from prolonged sleep-onset latency and about 43% had interrupted sleep. Over 64% of adolescents watched television (TV) in bed and >23% reported use of mobile phone in bed. About 64% of adolescents had at least one form of poor sleep hygiene behaviour. Decreasing age (0.7; 95% CI 0.582–0.843), studying while lying in bed (1.72; 95% CI 1.009–2.942), greater time gap between dinner and bedtime (0.795; 95% CI 0.650–0.972), staying awake late in the night and chatting on mobile phone (2.24; 95% CI 1.266–3.978) and watching TV (3.41; 95% CI 2.037– 5.722) significantly influenced excessive daytime sleepiness. Conclusion. A large proportion of adolescent students have abnormal sleep patterns and sleep hygiene behaviours. There is a need for concerted sleep-related education at the school level.


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