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MEDICAL EDUCATION
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 34  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 40-45

Establishing links between assessments and expected learning outcomes through curriculum mapping in a dental physiology curriculum


1 Department of Physiology, Melaka-Manipal Medical College, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Pharmacology and Centre for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Melaka-Manipal Medical College, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
3 Formerly Department of Physiology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Physiology, American University School of Medicine Aruba (AUSOMA), Wilhelminastraat 59, Oranjestad, Aruba

Correspondence Address:
Reem Rachel Abraham
Department of Physiology, American University School of Medicine Aruba (AUSOMA), Wilhelminastraat 59, Oranjestad
Aruba
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-258X.323445

Background. The relevance of curriculum mapping to determine the links between expected learning outcomes and assessment is well stated in the literature. Nevertheless, studies confirming the usage of such maps are minimal. Methods. We assessed links through curriculum mapping, between assessments and expected learning outcomes of dental physiology curriculum of three batches of students (2012–14) at Melaka-Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Manipal. The questions asked under each assessment method were mapped to the respective expected learning outcomes, and students’ scores in different assessments in physiology were gathered. Students’ (n = 220) and teachers’ (n=15) perspectives were collected through focus group discussion sessions and questionnaire surveys. Results. More than 75% of students were successful (≥50% scores) in majority of the assessments. There was moderate (r=0.4–0.6) to strong positive correlation (r=0.7–0.9) between majority of the assessments. However, students’ scores in viva voce had a weak positive correlation with the practical examination score (r=0.230). The score in the assessments of problem-based learning had either weak (r=0.1–0.3) or no correlation with other assessment scores. Conclusions. Through curriculum mapping, we were able to establish links between assessments and expected learning outcomes. We observed that, in the assessment system followed at MMMC, all expected learning outcomes were not given equal weightage in the examinations. Moreover, there was no direct assessment of self-directed learning skills. Our study also showed that assessment has supported students in achieving the expected learning outcomes as evidenced by the qualitative and quantitative data.


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