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MEDICAL EDUCATION
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 34  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 92-94

Communication skills training through ‘role play’ in an acute critical care course


1 Department of Emergency Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
2 Department of Neuroanaesthesia and Critical Care, J.P.N. Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
3 Department of Critical Care, J.P.N. Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
4 Department of Onco-Anaesthesia and Palliative Care, Dr B.R. Ambedkar Institute–Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
5 Department of Emergency Medicine, J.P.N. Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
6 Department of Paediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
7 Wirral Teaching Hospitals, Core Surgical Training Merseyside, North West of England, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK

Correspondence Address:
Richa Aggarwal
Department of Critical Care, J.P.N. Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-258X.326757

Background. Effective patient–doctor communication is a key component of patient-centred care, which is one of the six pillars of quality healthcare delivery. Structured and effective communication skills training for healthcare providers is the need of hour in medical education. We assessed the efficacy of role play and simulation in developing communication skills. Methods. As a key component of an acute critical care course (ACCC), communication skills are taught using role play models and simulation. Live feedback is critical in learning during this course as per the principles of adult learning (andragogy). Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to assess the efficacy of ACCC. Results. The 19th ACCC was introduced to interns at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in December 2018. The teaching methodology and objective-oriented structured training in ACCC were much appreciated for training in human factors with emphasis on communication. A positive response was obtained from the candidates 3 weeks after they completed the course to assess whether interns are able to make use of this training in their day-to-day clinical practice amounting to a reliable evidence level of Kirkpatrick's ‘return of investment’. Conclusion. The use of ‘role play’ to teach communication skills is effective and superior to lecture-based teaching. Further structured and interactive programmes in communication skills training will improve patient care, relatives’ satisfaction and the image of medical profession.


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