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Correspondence
36 (
1
); 67-67
doi:
10.25259/NMJI_600_22

Certification of maxillofacial disability and impairment

Dentistry Government General Hospital Manjeri, Kacheripadi, Kerala, India
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

[To cite: Shamim T. Certification of maxillofacial disability and impairment [Correspondence]. Natl Med J India 2023;36:67. DOI: 10.25259/NMJI_600_22]

Dental professionals are included in the medical board of health institutions in India to give expert opinion on evaluation and procedure for certification of maxillofacial disability and impairment. The Extraordinary Gazette of India had issued guidelines for the purpose of assessing the extent of specified disability in a person under the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Act, 2016 (49 of 2016) as annexure II on 5 January 2018, but had omitted maxillofacial disability and impairment in the reported guidelines.1 We attempt to detail maxillofacial disability and impairment that should be added in the revised guidelines of Rights of Persons with Disabilities Act, 2016 (49 of 2016). The maxillofacial disability and impairment may be measured in terms of loss of motion, loss of muscle strength and loss of coordination.2

The McBride method introduced by the American orthopedic surgeon McBride in 1936 is still used for evaluation and certification of maxillofacial disability and impairment in India.3 Evaluation of facial impairment and tooth loss is graduated as per the McBride method (Table I).3 Tooth loss is graduated for natural as well as artificial teeth and the maximum percentage admissible under the McBride method is 15%.

TABLE I. McBride method for certification of maxillofacial disability and impairment3
Maxillofacial disability and impairment Impairment
whole
percentage
Evaluation criteria for impairment of face
I. Fracture of the jaws including disfigurement
  A. Maxilla united with malocclusion 8
  B. Mandibular: malocclusion 8
  C. Condyloid process: painful occlusion 8
II. Ankylosis temporomandibular joint (motion 1 0
limited 1/4 to 1/2 inch)
III. Loss of all teeth replaceable with prosthesis 1 5
IV. Loss of tongue: one-third 5
V. Loss of ear auricle 5
VI. Nose injury interfering with breathing 7
Evaluation criteria of tooth loss
I. Tooth loss
  A. Anterior teeth (incisor) 0.3
  B. Canine 0.45
  C. Premolar 0.45
  D. Molar 0.9
II. Implant crown
  A. Anterior teeth (incisor) 0.06
  B. Canine 0.09
  C. Premolar 0.09
  D. Molar 0.18
III. Denture
  A. Pontic site 0.06–0.18
  B. Removable denture site 0.09–0.27
  C. Full denture 0.15–0.45
IV. Complete tooth loss 15

Conflict of interest

None declared

References

  1. The Gazette of India Extraordinary Part II—Section 3—Sub-section (ii) Section 56 of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Act, 2016 (49 of 2016) Available at www.swavlambancard.gov.in/public/files/ProceduresGuidelines.pdf (accessed on 8 Jul 2022)
    [Google Scholar]
  2. , , , , , . Why and how maxillofacial disability and impairment due to trauma should be quantified for compensation: A need for nationwide guidelines. J Maxillofac Oral Surg. 2014;13:425-30.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  3. , , , , , . A study on disability and impairment of dental disorders in Korea. J Oral Med Pain. 2018;43:70-6.
    [Google Scholar]

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