Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Filter by Categories
Acknowledgements
Book Review
Book Reviews
Classics In Indian Medicine
Clinical Case Report
Clinical Case Reports
CLINICAL RESEARCH METHODS
Clinico-pathological Conference
Conferences
Correspondence
Editorial
Eminent Indians in Medicine
Errata
Erratum
Everyday Practice
Film Review
History of Medicine
HOW TO DO IT
Images In Medicine
Letter from Bristol
Letter from Chennai
Letter From Ganiyari
Letter from Glasgow
Letter from London
Letter From Mumbai
Letter From Nepal
Masala
Medical Education
Medical Ethics
Medicine and Society
News From Here And There
Notices
Obituary
Original Article
Original Articles
Review Article
SELECTED SUMMARIES
Selected Summary
Short Report
Short Reports
Speaking for Myself
Speaking for Ourselve
Speaking for Ourselves
Students@nmji
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Images In Medicine
2017:30:4;242-242
doi: 10.4103/0970-258X.218686
PMID: 29162764

Extensive commotio retinae involving peripheral retina

Koushik Tripathy, Rohan Chawla
 Dr Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Corresponding Author:
Rohan Chawla
Dr Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
India
dr.rohanrpc@gmail.com
How to cite this article:
Tripathy K, Chawla R. Extensive commotio retinae involving peripheral retina. Natl Med J India 2017;30:242
Copyright: (C)2017 The National Medical Journal of India

A 16-year-old boy was injured by a cricket ball a day before presenting to us. The left fundus showed large areas of whitish opacification of the peripheral retina ([Figure - 1], arrow) suggestive of commotio retinae. Visual acuity was 6/6 and the whiteness resolved at 1 week without any pigmentation.

Figure 1: Fundus photomontage of the left eye shows peripheral retinal whitening (commotio retinae, arrow)

Following closed globe injury, commotio retinae occurs due to disruption of photoreceptor outer segments and is not true oedema. It may occur at the macula, manifesting as a cherry red spot (Berlin's oedema) and/or it can involve the peripheral retina. Commotio retinae commonly resolves spontaneously without sequelae. There is no known treatment.

Acknowledgement

We thank Trina Sengupta Tripathy for her support and technical assistance during preparation of the manuscript.


Fulltext Views
41

PDF downloads
22
Show Sections