Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Filter by Categories
Acknowledgements
Book Review
Book Reviews
Classics In Indian Medicine
Clinical Case Report
Clinical Case Reports
Clinical Research Methods
Clinico-pathological Conference
Conferences
Correspondence
Editorial
Eminent Indians in Medicine
Errata
Erratum
Everyday Practice
Film Review
History of Medicine
HOW TO DO IT
Images In Medicine
Indian Medical Institutions
Letter from Bristol
Letter from Chennai
Letter From Ganiyari
Letter from Glasgow
Letter from London
Letter From Mumbai
Letter From Nepal
Masala
Medical Education
Medical Ethics
Medicine and Society
News From Here And There
Notices
Obituaries
Obituary
Original Article
Original Articles
Review Article
Selected Summaries
Selected Summary
Short Report
Short Reports
Speaking for Myself
Speaking for Ourselve
Speaking for Ourselves
Students@nmji
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Images in Medicine
35 (
3
); 185-185
doi:
10.25259/NMJI-35-3-185

Superior semicircular canal dehiscence: An unusual cause of vertigo

Department of ENT, Al Azhar Medical College and Super Specialty Hospital, Ezhalloor P.O. Thodupuzha, Idukki 685605, Kerala, India
Department of ENT, KIMS Al Shifa Super Specialty Hospital, Perinthalmanna, Kerala, India
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

[To cite: Sureshkumar S, Francis AA. Superior semicircular canal dehiscence: An unusual cause of vertigo. Natl Med J India 2022;35:185.]

A 29-year-old man with complaints of rotatory vertigo, right side conductive hearing loss, tinnitus and autophony presented to the outpatients department of ENT. He had normal otoscopic examination. Cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential was abnormal (Fig. 1). High-resolution computed tomography temporal bone (plane of Pöschl) revealed a dehiscence of the right superior semicircular canal (Fig. 2). Superior semicircular canal dehiscence or Minor syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the absence of bone overlying the superior semicircular canal resulting in a third window to membranous labyrinth that may result in a syndrome of vestibular and/or auditory symptoms.

FIG 1.: Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials are present when stimulated with 95, 90, 80 and 70 dB stimuli. Thresholds are reduced and amplitudes are increased on the right side suggestive of abnormal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential findings
FIG 2.: Pöschl view of the temporal bone showing dehiscence of the right superior semicircular canal. The plane of projection is perpendicular to the long axis of the temporal bone

Conflicts of interest

None declared


Fulltext Views
165

PDF downloads
22
View/Download PDF
Download Citations
BibTeX
RIS
Show Sections